Total Knee Replacement

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Total Knee Replacement (TKR)

What is total knee replacement (TKR)?

This is a procedure where the diseased knee joint is surgically replaced with an artificial material. It usually involves the use of an implant.

How does Total Knee Replacement (TKR) help?

The surgery is performed when either the ends of the femur, fibula or tibia are damaged or if the patella is damaged. High density plastic is used to replace the cartilage on the shin bone and the patella. This replacement provides relief from pain and helps in easier mobility.

How is Total Knee Replacement (TKR) done?

Preparation

Before the surgery doctors advice a few exercises to strengthen the knee. X-rays, ECGs, blood and urine tests are taken to make sure that the patient is healthy for an anaesthetic and surgery.

Preparation
Treatment Procedure
Post Treatment

Before the surgery doctors advice a few exercises to strengthen the knee. X-rays, ECGs, blood and urine tests are taken to make sure that the patient is healthy for an anaesthetic and surgery.

After the anaesthetic effect kicks in the doctor makes an incision in the knee. Then he removes the damaged cartilage and attaches the metal implants to the ends of the thigh and calf bones. The implant goes in between the metal pieces and helps the new joint move smoothly.



After the surgery the doctor prescribes some painkillers and the patient stays under observation for a few days. The hospital staff helps the patient to move around as it increases blood flow and reduces the swelling. Physical therapy is suggested as it increases the strength, mobility and flexibility of that region.

Causes

Alcohol and tobacco use (including smokeless tobacco, sometimes called “chewing tobacco” or “snuff”) are the two most important risk factors for head and neck cancers, especially cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx. Following are the causes of Head and Neck Cancer:

How does Total Knee Replacement (TKR) helps?

  • Removes the damaged thigh bone and shin bone.
  • Avoids extra stress on other parts of the leg.
  • Improves the quality of life.
Risks
Limitations
  • Infection
  • Blood clots
  • Nerve and artery damage
  • Allergic reactions
  • Breathing problems
  • Pain and swelling
  • Patients aged above 65 may develop infections.
  • If the surgery is not carried out in a well sterilized environment it could also result in inflammatory reactions.

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